The 2014 Tomorrowland festival (Flickr/StampMedia)

If the name makes you think of Disneyland, you’re right. “Tomorrowland” is a theme section at Disneyland. The original Walt Disney, a great fan of futuristic ideas, said that the Disneyland version was designed “to give you an opportunity to participate in adventures that are a living blueprint of our future.”

The global music festival called “Tomorrowland” (apparently sharing the name with no objections from Disney) has the same goal … sort of. What is being offered, however, is neither a musical experience nor a technological one. The festival is openly spiritual, weaving “stories” and “fairy tales” in between the musical performances to communicate a hybrid of Luciferian, Wiccan and Hindu religion.

This year the “Tomorrowland” festival comes to Israel for the first time as the new 11,000-seat Payis Arena Stadium in the Holy City of Jerusalem hosts this pagan missionary outreach extravaganza, choosing instead to see it as “the world’s biggest music festival.”

Is “Tomorrowland” just another music festival? Here’s a little background.

This festival began in 2005 in Belgium, and its growth has been impressive. Starting in 2008, it settled on a weekend in late July, and the numbers topped 50,000. By 2012, the headcount was an incredible 185,000 participants. In 2013, a companion festival was established in the USA (Georgia), named “Tomorrow World”. The following year, “Tomorrowland” opened a second base in Brazil. Then in 2015 came the idea of “mirror” festivals, live-linked from different locations via giant video screens. The “Mirror to Tomorrowland” festivals enabled youth to “unite” through the mirror and “be part of the Madness” in six countries: Mexico, India, Japan, Colombia, Germany and South Africa. On July 23 (the second day of the 3-day Belgian festival), Israel becomes mirror number seven to join the madness. The Jerusalem event is scheduled to run on July 23, 2016 from 8:00 p.m. until 4:00 a.m.

Why a linked “mirror”, and not just a simultaneous festival? Apparently there is no compromising on the goal of “building bridges” between Belgium, which directs the spiritual content, and the satellite cities, which manage the local music talent, stage sets and fans. Read on to discover why this link is so vital.

Each year revolves around a theme, and these provide the first clue that despite its billing as a global music festival, “Tomorrowland” is not really about music. The concepts of “life” and “happiness,” the “power” and “mysteries” of the invisible world, are explored in captivating, high-budget theme clips released well ahead of each festival. Often music is not even mentioned in these introductions. The second clue is that every single intro clip—as well as the festival kickoff ceremonies beamed from Belgium—includes the reverent opening of an animated book called “the book of wisdom,” from which all the festival’s “stories” are drawn. On its cover is the logo of “Tomorrowland,” an ambiguous design except for the “third eye,” the traditional occult sign of spiritual enlightenment. The eye is crowned, symbolizing a claim of lordship over this spiritual power source.

“The book of wisdom” was mentioned in the video promo clip for 2013 Georgia festival, stating, “The book of wisdom will be opened in our second home.” In the 2012 video, these explanations and visuals leave no doubt as to the pagan roots of this “wisdom.” The custodians of these writings (portrayed in the clip as bizarre horned characters engaged in various occult activities) are described as a “magnificent civilization” composed of “fairy-tale keepers,” and they receive honorable mention during the festivals.

The video promo clips also follow the accepted method of gradually introducing the occult New Age philosophy called the Ageless Wisdom, to achieve the “transformation” of the masses and prepare them to unite under the “world teacher”. “Tomorrowland” themes in later years carefully extended the foundation laid in 2012.

In “The Arising of Life” (Tomorrowland 2013 Trailer), hints are dropped about an unidentified man who is “hidden from civilization” somewhere, and who is unlocking ancient secrets for mankind. This clip invites you to “connect with the beings who roam in the heart of this magical land … Just because you haven’t seen something doesn’t mean it doesn’t exist.”

“The Key to Happiness” (Tomorrowland 2014 Trailer) “reveals a secret behind a magical key …” which acquaints festival-goers with another occult symbol of the mythical pathway to enlightenment: a mythical ancient machine waiting to be reactivated. Here again, we are told that this machine was built for mankind in the past by a mysterious hidden man, who entrusted the key to “guardians.”

Only once does music become a theme (“The Secret Kingdom of Melodia,” 2015). The short intro teases the viewer by asking where all music comes from. A longer clip presents music as merely a gateway into the spirit dimension, using innocent children as models, but doesn’t answer the question. You get that later at the Belgium festival, which introduces “the king of Melodia” … an image embedded in what looks like a Christian cathedral, framed by organ pipes. In fact, the audio reveals church-like organ music playing … not exactly the favorite genre for party-loving youth, but some things are more important than pleasing fans. Over this background music, the narrator explains that “The king of Melodia holds all music in his heart. His only desire is to unite the world in a single melody, and giving joy to all who come to his kingdom.”

Readers who know their Bibles will remember that as “the covering cherub” in God’s holy mountain, one particular archangel was endowed with musical ability, described as inlaid “tambourines and pipes” (Ezek.28:13, Hebrew). His Hebrew name, “Heilel ben Shahar” (Is.14:12, “brightstar, son of the dawn”) indicates his ability to illuminate the darkness. So when the Belgian “mirror” tells us that the music produced by the king of Melodia has “immense power, filling the world with illuminating sounds,” we can know exactly which “kingdom” is sponsoring “Tomorrowland.”

Can it get any worse? Sadly yes. This year’s theme is “The Elixir of Life” (Tomorrowland 2016 Introduction Trailer) in which a beautiful Wiccan maiden roams through an equally beautiful forest, consulting a book and gathering ingredients for a spell. The witch tells us that “it is from the past that our secret elixir originates,” and that the necessary ingredients are “in a place where only the chosen ones can enter.” Her cryptic statement, “We are all connected to her; it is her voice that guides me,” is left unexplained, but Gaia worshipers will understand. She needs one last ingredient to establish “my road to eternal bliss,” and to find it she has to walk blindfolded—a common requirement for an occult initiate.

There’s no mention whatsoever of music in the Tomorrowland 2016 Introduction Trailer. And we’re supposed to believe that this is the “the world’s biggest music festival”?

Nevertheless, the Israeli Ministry of Tourism has welcomed this blatantly occult festival to carry out its activities in Jerusalem, the city in which God has chosen for His name to abide (2 Chron. 6:6). So what does the Israeli media say about “Tomorrowland”?

Sadly Israel’s secular media has suffered from a similar willful blindness. The Jerusalem Post obediently described “Tomorrowland” as “one of the biggest electronic music festivals in the world.” The Tourist Israel site also went along with the “electronic music” story, but also embedded the Tomorrowland 2016 promo clip that proclaims that “something miraculous is about to happen,” if participants will just “look into the mirror and unite” with the power coming through the Belgian live-feed.

And Ynet naively accepted the fairy tale that this pagan festival has come to Jerusalem out of kindness to save Israelis their travel expenses: “On Tour, the primary marketer of the festival in Belgium, says that popular Israeli demand led to the decision to host the special event in Israel. Huge numbers of Israelis travel to the ‘Tomorrowland’ festival every year.”

Do you believe that? Bringing the “Tomorrowland” occult festival to Jerusalem is to save money for Israeli travelers? As one of the “Tomorrowland” promo clips so smugly remarks that with occultists “nothing is what it seems.”

But we don’t need “Tomorrowland” to tell us that we live in a spiritual world.

For our fight is not against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against powers, against the rulers of the darkness of this world, and against spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly places. – Eph. 6:12

What can we do, those of us who love the God of Israel and His people? “All authority in heaven and on earth” (Matt. 28:18) belongs to Yeshua, no matter what the Tomorrowland’s “book of wisdom” might claim! We ask the body of Messiah worldwide to stand with us in prayer, as we intercede for our nation of Israel and our people.

Therefore take up the whole armor of God that you may be able to resist in the evil day, and having done all, to stand …  Pray in the Spirit always with all kinds of prayer and supplication. – Eph. 6:13, 18

For the original article, visit kehilanews.com.

 

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